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Autism Resources
Our resources are designed to help you learn more about autism,
and to give you information and strategies to deal with the wide
range of challenges facing every family. With these tools, you
and your family will build the capacity for self-management,
self-advocacy, academic success and, hopefully,
a better, happier life.

Resources

Employment

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Among adults with autism, nearly 85% are unemployed. The opportunity to have a job or career offers a quality of life that many adults on the spectrum do not have. As they are beginning the job search, just “being there” will help change your son or daughter’s perspective on the world. Keep in mind that during this process you are a mentor, even though your child may be an adult. In order to help them have a successful job search, aid them in identifying strengths and weaknesses while teaching your son or daughter how to promote themselves. This counseling will provide both professional and psychological support to your child. Once your child has received a job, it is no longer your responsibility to intervene on their behalf at the job site, but rather counsel them from home and monitor their development on regular basis. Lastly, advise your son or daughter on how to properly search for jobs, complete applications, and what to do during an interview. For interview training, be sure to review the proper voice tone, facial expressions, nonverbal communication, and eye contact.

Although it is difficult for those on the spectrum to find a job, several organizations and websites have been created to not only locate the proper employment, but also assist with independent living accommodations. Most with autism spend their life surrounded by friends and family, making it difficult to move out as an individual adult once finding a job, even if they have been eager to take control of their own life. There are some adults with autism who still need constant supervision, but others can live independently once provided with the proper opportunities to socialize and live as non-disabled people within the community.

Autism Delaware

This program seeks to help adult diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder find employment and proper living arrangements anywhere in the state of Delaware. Once enrolled in this program, adults with autism should expect to receive individualized supports which may include the following: assessment, placement, job development, job training, and other follow-along services. Many with autism will tend to succeed in careers that are detail oriented and require little interaction with peers, such as computer sciences or research. Their job coach program will assist the adolescent or young adult with autism in obtaining a job and provide onsite support and assistance, or basically creating a job for a specific person.

Furthermore, Autism Delaware will assist adults with autism in locating sheltered employment and residential services, allowing each individual to live as independently as desired.

Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

This association works to make the general public and employers aware of the vast need of employing those with disabilities. In addition to advancing equitable employment, APSE also provide opportunities for adults with disabilities to engage in community life, control their personal resources, seek employment, and work in competitive settings. For those with a disability looking for employment, simply locate your local APSE chapter to begin your job search today.

Autism Job Board

The idea behind autismjobboard.com website is to allow you to look for employers who will hire passionate and qualified employees. While this website is not full proof in instantly finding you a job, it does present a group of employers willing to consider applicants with autism for various positions.

Getting Hired

Similar to the previous website, gettinghired.com seeks to connect employers with potential employees with disabilities through an online interface. This allows the disabled people to search for the job want, and for the employer to review qualified applicants with ease knowing they are from reliable services and resources.

 

References

Getting Hired (2015) www.gettinghired.com

Autism Job Board (2015) www.autismjobboard.com

Autism Delaware (2014) Employment Living Arrangements

Association of People Supporting Employment First (2014) www.apse.org